CESI Post & Telecom Trade Council adopts positions on TTIP and flexible working time

11 Dec 2015

Today, CESI’s Trade council ‘Post & Telecom’ – the internal forum of debate and deliberation of CESI’s postal and telecom sector member organisations – held its second (and last) meeting of the year. During the meeting, current developments, priorities and challenges in the postal and telecom sectors were addressed. Most notably, this included the effects of the TTIP on workers in the postal and telecom sectors and the impacts of privatisation and digitisation on working time flexibility in the two sectors. Position papers were adopted on both topics.

CESI Post & Telecom Trade Council adopts positions on TTIP and flexible working time

The position on flexible working time and service periods calls on the European institutions and employers to take measures to ensure that employees in the post and telecom (P&T) sectors are not left at a disadvantage as working times are made more flexible under the pretext of increasing competition.

More predictable working time in the P&T sectors necessary

“We cannot seriously have reached the stage where an employee can no longer commit to a private appointment or plan her or his family life”, the position stipulates.

The adoption of the position was preceded by a presentation by and discussion with Maximilian Strotman, member of the cabinet of the European Commissioner for the digital single market, Andrus Ansip.

Safeguards for labour rights in TTIP desirable

The position on TTIP urges the EU institutions and employers to take measures to ensure that the impact of a forthcoming TTIP does not have any negative consequences on the world of work for employees in the post and telecom sectors. More specifically, the trade council demands that:
• no threat to national employee rights or consumer protection, social and environmental standards must be made;
• no ‘dumping competition’ must occur in which EU Member States or companies located in the EU create advantages for themselves through social dumping and environmental protection dumping; and that
• existing and future national laws must not be negatively impacted on by TTIP when it comes to collective bargaining, the right to strike, minimum wages, wage agreements and the broader regulation of the labour markets and social protection systems.

This position was informed by a presentation by Adrian Klein from the General Secretariat of the DPVKOM, a German trade union in the communications sector and affiliate of CESI.

The position papers will be published soon in the policy positions section of CESI’s website. The next meeting of the ‘Post & Telecom’  Trade council is scheduled for May 2016 (tbc.)